Monthly Archive: April 2011

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/

Field trip! On learning from the specimen preservation experts

For centuries, people have collected and preserved everything from birds to beetles to mice and mosquitoes. Well-preserved historical specimens are rich caches of information about everything from taxonomy to pollution to the spread of disease. As I wrote a few weeks ago, NEON will be collecting many thousands of specimens from carefully chosen groups of organisms to provide information about air, soil and water quality and about important ecosystem services like pollination and food production.

It’s a major undertaking just to collect, preserve and analyze that many specimens, and another enormous challenge to keep track of each specimen’s whereabouts and to make specimen data freely available to anyone who wants it. NEON biologists, computer scientists and web developers are busy setting up ways to coordinate the collection, preservation, and tracking of our specimens over the next 30 years. We’re aiming to sync with online specimen libraries like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Barcode of Life Datasystem so that people around the world can get at the data we’ve gathered. We also recently joined the Registry of Biological Repositories to help make our collections traceable from within NEON to their final homes in institutions across the country.

One institution in Boulder, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, already houses an old, extensive and beautiful collection of natural specimens.  The museum curators were kind enough to give a few dozen NEON employees a tour back in March. Some of us went to get a better sense of the art and science of natural collections keeping. But we all welcomed the opportunity to take a field trip away from the office and visit some furry, scaly, leafy and fossilized representatives of both ancient and recent residents of Earth.

I’ve put together a slideshow with photos and audio from the tour. In seven minutes, you can see most of what we spent well over an hour oohing and aahing over in the mammals and vertebrates collections. It’s too bad there wasn’t enough time for all of us to see all the natural treasures tucked away inside the museum walls.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.neonnotes.org/2011/04/field-trip-on-learning-from-the-specimen-preservation-experts/